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Guest Kyle

Is The Vortex Speeding Up?

12 posts in this topic

Guest Kyle

I hope it's not just me, but I'm starting to notice that the Vortex is speeding up. Whether it's mentally speeding up or really speeding up is a different story. No, this isn't a rumor, but more a personal thought. Has anyone else noticed this? Or am I just in a league of my own?

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Not true. The entire ride, along with Stingray etc., used to be manually operated (in terms of speed etc.) by the ride-op but Dreamworld, in an attempt to reduce premium costs, has retrofitted most of their older rides with an automatic computer system, that constantly gives a cosistent speed. So uhh... unless you were riding the ride say six years ago, even then there wouldn't have been much difference.

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Sorry, it's been a while since I've checked the operating systems of rides. SK2 is right, Kyle. The automatic computer system for the Vortex spins it at the same speed. Only wear or tear can slow the ride down, and to my experience, you can't really do that with a ride like the Vortex. Mental. The thought is mental, This post is mental, This topic is not needed, And you are not needed. Have a good day. By the way, I know I'm being a little bit harsh but if you want to make a good name for yourself, you need to rethink what you say and who you say it to. You're obviously an ameteur at the theme park business, and you're telling people that have great experience and knowledge all this rubbish. I'll try and be nice from now on. If you're good.

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OK, I'm going out on a limb here and am going to throw my partial support behind Kyle. You said it here Themeparkmaster:

Only wear or tear can slow the ride down, and to my experience, you can't really do that with a ride like the Vortex.
If the 3-phase motor has been either replaced or refurbished, the bearings replaced (to name two possibilities) then it is very possible the ride is running at a slightly faster speed. In my past dealings with refurbished rides and maintenance departments, this has often occured - ride RPM has increased noticably (to those who ride them regularly) with the aforementioned types of maintenance. Having said this, I agree, Themeparkmaster, it is impossible to manually (as an operator) adjust or speed the motor up from its predetermined maximum RPM, on almost all rides. Out of interest Kyle, when was the last time you rode it? (if you have increased in body mass, you will almost certainly notice an increase in G's. You been eating too much junkfood?

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I agree with you Zamperla, but poor Kylie here is only talking about "actual" speed wise. And no, the engine hasn't been replaced recently nor has any significant wear or tear happening recently either, so uhhh... negatory with this one sarge.

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You said it here Themeparkmaster: If the 3-phase motor has been either replaced or refurbished, the bearings replaced (to name two possibilities) then it is very possible the ride is running at a slightly faster speed. In my past dealings with refurbished rides and maintenance departments, this has often occured - ride RPM has increased noticably (to those who ride them regularly) with the aforementioned types of maintenance.
That would make sense if you assume that the motor was operating at peak output, which i doubt is the case. If its computer controlled its still going to be operating at a determined shaft speed, there would have to be something to determine the actual shaft speed, rather than just simply switching the motor on and off. I doubt they would simply leave current control (and in effect, the motor) to a resistance figure (basically working like a giant rheostat reducing resistance to increase the speed of the motor), it wouldnt provide accurate operation of the ride (simple things like heat increases would result in the shaft speed being reduced). The main difference with the worn motor is that it would be drawing more current (due to an increase in resistance and heat) to achieve the same speeds, its not really a case of would the shaft speed be less, but what it takes to achieve the same.

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