SuperYoshi

SE Question

46 posts in this topic

I had always assumed they were there to determine whether the train had cleared the top hat, but what Tim is saying is pretty plausible too.
post-2853-1263295767_thumb.jpg This camera is pointing at the top hat, so the ride operator can see if the train clears it. Thats why I'd say the sensor is there for wind speed.

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The ride systems themselves would want to know about a rollback too though.
I reckon there would be sensors on the launch track somewhere to do that. Maybe just after the brakes finish? A sensor on the very top wouldn't be able to identify a rollback, because it would sense the train going over the top and either continue over, or go back the way it came. Unless there are two separate sensors beside each other it wouldn't know the difference. Edit: I take that back, there are two sensors so it would make complete sense..... Don't mind me! :S Edited by TimMc333

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Just wondering what these censors would be used for?
The censors would prevent people from swearing from the top of the hill! :lol: (pretty sure you meant Sensor)
I had always assumed they were there to determine whether the train had cleared the top hat, but what Tim is saying is pretty plausible too.
Looking at the picture, I believe you are correct Gazza. To me they look like PLCs. The fact that there are two would be a good indication that they are a clearance \ rollback sensor. Think about the cables they string across main roads to gauge vehicles travelling on the road - there are two cables (or sensors) to determine direction and speed. <edit> Tim - the sensors are on the top for exactly that reason - they are like any other block section on any coaster in the world -
  1. First sensor followed by second sensor - train clear
  2. First sensor, second sensor, second sensor, first sensor - alarm - rollback
  3. first sensor first sensor - alarm - rollback
  4. no sensor - alarm - rollback
<end edit> Granted, there is a camera pointing toward the top hat, but my thinking is that unlike conventional coasters (think lethal) the operator cannot see the first hill. As a coaster will make it back to the station if it has cleared the first hill (with some woodies as exceptions) it would be helpful to be able to see it. It may also give the operator a clear indication of a rollback before the PLC's start screaming at them. I don't believe it is any sort of wind or "how much force is needed for launching" sensor. The force is determined before launch by weighing the train. There may be other devices (such as wind gauges) but they are not the items pictured. For one, a wind gauge would look like this: <ok so the picture didn't work - just google wind gauge to see a propeller type thing with little semi-spheres on the end> I would be more inclined to think that the system measures how much force is required to propel the train over the top hat, and then adds a little more to allow for wind, which is why some launches feel different to others. Just my thoughts on the issue. Edited by AlexB

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I would be more inclined to think that the system measures how much force is required to propel the train over the top hat, and then adds a little more to allow for wind, which is why some launches feel different to others.
That sounds about right, but wouldn't it make more sense to put a wind gauge at the top of the top hat, rather than on the ground somewhere?

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I think the camera is there for the ride operator to keep an eye on things - if you've ever looked inside the far side operator box on Lethal Weapon you would've seen where the cameras look, even though the ride would have a PLC looking after the block zones. I think you'd also find the wind gauge atop Lethal Weapon. I imagine the ride computers could take input from external sources for such things.

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A lot of weather sensing systems are completely seperate to ride systems, and require the operator to periodically check them, immeadiately ceasing operation if things such as wind speed breach an acceptable limit. Personally, Ive never really seen a weather monitoring system actually affect the ride systems operation, except for Giant Drop at Dreamworld with it's wind alarm.

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The censors would prevent people from swearing from the top of the hill! :lol: (pretty sure you meant Sensor)
LOL sorry :P I was thinking that the sensor was there to detect rollbacks, but also give clearance to the 2nd train to begin the pre-show, and then when the 1st train entered the loading bay, the 2nd train could launch. Does that sound right? I was at MW 2 days ago, 2 of the 4 times I went on SE we got stuck on the corner just before you proceed onto the launch pad, and I read somewhere that meant the next block section was not cleared. (unloading bay)

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LOL sorry :P I was thinking that the sensor was there to detect rollbacks, but also give clearance to the 2nd train to begin the pre-show, and then when the 1st train entered the loading bay, the 2nd train could launch. Does that sound right? I was at MW 2 days ago, 2 of the 4 times I went on SE we got stuck on the corner just before you proceed onto the launch pad, and I read somewhere that meant the next block section was not cleared. (unloading bay)
That's right, because if the first train is being unloaded and the second train launches, they are on a collision course... The first train must enter the load station before the second one can launch...

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Good find Gazza, but thats strange, don't you think the bird would have just moved like they do in front of cars. :huh: Must have been to fast. A bit off topic but if anyone has wondered what its like to be on the SDSC broken down there are two new videos on youtube, you just have to put up with teenage girls screaming and crying that the worlds going to end, but one does show the evacuation procedure.

Edited by SuperYoshi

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Haha Gazza if that's the day we were there I was on that ride of Stealth when we very much killed that bird.

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A bit off topic but if anyone has wondered what its like to be on the SDSC broken down there are two new videos on youtube, you just have to put up with teenage girls screaming and crying that the worlds going to end, but one does show the evacuation procedure.
haha, those videos are so funny, the dialogue in the second one especially, they were really freaking out. Does anyone know if any compensation is given to patrons who are stuck on a ride for a prolonged period of time such as food vouchers etc. etc?

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^ Well on one of the videos it said '45 minutes later'. Though I'm pretty sure they weren't keeping track on time the way they were acting. If it was true however they should have, 45+ is a long time to wait.

For one, a wind gauge would look like this:
Theres one on the cyclone just after you finish the lift hill. Heres a working picture: post-2298-1263603076_thumb.jpg Also, what does PLC stand for? :blink: Edited by SuperYoshi

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Also, what does PLC stand for? :blink:
Another key to safety is the control of the roller coaster's operating computers: programmable logic controllers (often called PLCs). A PLC detects faults associated with the mechanism and makes decisions to operate roller coaster elements (e.g. lift, track-switches and brakes) based on configured state and operator actions. Periodic maintenance and inspection are required to verify structures and materials are within expected wear tolerances and are in sound working order. Sound operating procedures are also a key to safety.

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So in short - Programmable Logic Controller. They can be used for just about anything - triggering special effects (such as steam and sound effects on superman, turning the lift hill off once the train has cleared it on lethal, etc etc. When travelling on scooby, sit in the front seat and look down at the track as you go around - you'll see LED's blinking at you as you make your way around. In scooby, with so many trains, it is especially important, not just to trigger the special effects, but to ensure each gondola has cleared the block section before it allows the next one in (or in the case of the lift, making sure the lift doesn't move until the two gondolas have locked into the lift carriage.) They work like proximity sensors - so things like public transport cards where you wave it in front of a pad - use the same sort of concept. A transponder is located under each car \ train \ gondola and tells the computer where the train is. The ride computer (or effects computer as the case may be) then triggers a pre-programmed event based on the information fed from the PLCs. If a PLC doesn't respond when the computer expects it to (within tolerance) it triggers a fault - and causes a shutdown. As brake systems are designed to fail safe, generally when a fault is triggered, (or power outage as the case may be) all the brakes lock closed to prevent trains travelling further around the track. You may also notice when in the disco room for scooby, sometimes when you go through the wild mouse curves, you get slowed down before you enter the next curve. This is because of weight in the car making it go faster than the cars in front of it, and the computer slows the car to prevent an unsafe distance. If you've ever played corners on a bus or in a car - get 3 "reasonably heavy" friends and try it on scooby - you'll need the first ride of the day, and watch it FLY through the corners.

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You may also notice when in the disco room for scooby, sometimes when you go through the wild mouse curves, you get slowed down before you enter the next curve. This is because of weight in the car making it go faster than the cars in front of it, and the computer slows the car to prevent an unsafe distance. If you've ever played corners on a bus or in a car - get 3 "reasonably heavy" friends and try it on scooby - you'll need the first ride of the day, and watch it FLY through the corners.
I always thought it slowed you so that you didn't pull too many lateral G's in the corners.... But that makes sense too... Well there you go.. :)

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