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Brad2912

Dreamworld - tiger escape scenario

18 posts in this topic

8 hours ago, Brad2912 said:

Interested to know what the  “tiger escape scenario” would look like... 

I'm hoping it would be similar to that Chinese zoo that dresses its empoyees up as animals to practice for an escape scenario.

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5 hours ago, Jdude95 said:

I'm hoping it would be similar to that Chinese zoo that dresses its empoyees up as animals to practice for an escape scenario.

That was my hope too haha

i do wonder however if there is emergency live firearms available for suitably trained security or handlers.

im sure there would be a tranq gun, and I’d never want to see a tiger killed for being a tiger, but just wonder whether such a last resort measure exists 

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Like any zoo with carnivore predators, (this is only my assumption \ opinion) You would have to assume that they have a range of non-lethal and lethal options to deal with an escaped tiger.

Yes, I realise given what we've heard this week thats a big leap to make, but in the case of the tigers, I don't think anybody can imagine that 'it's all good' - neutralising weapons would have to be present.

The next time someone's down there talking to Pat - can you ask him?

As for an escape 'scenario' - no, they're not releasing a tiger, and they're not dressing up in a suit. Either handlers would 'walk' a tiger out to simulate the escape, or they would literally just hold a piece of paper saying 'escaped tiger'. for simulations, there's no need to go to the level of dressing up, or actually releasing a tiger.

Again - this is all my own assumption, etc - but I would suggest that once identified, an all-park alarm through two-way and or other comms devices would occur. Staff should all be trained to usher guests away from the reported location, and or secure guests inside fences, ride envelopes or buildings.

And no - nobody is waiting for QPS to arrive. if that animal places any human life at risk, it should be shot without hesitation... harambe be damned.

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there is a code for an all park emergency. Not tiger specific. 

During the days of the  turntable was there a blocking point somewhere on the ride to create a distance between rafts?

does not appear like it from the video posted.

Edited by dbo121

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@AlexB I’d make a similar assumption on the tigers escape situation, that lethal options would have be available. If a tiger is attacking people screw waiting for a tranq dart to come into effect. I just wonder who is trained and has access to such weapons. Is it security? Or Pat and his team? Do they have to ensure someone trained and with a firearms licence is rostered and on site at all times? I know this is getting a little Jurassic World and all, but do the tigers have trackers on them in case of an escape? 

These are questions I’ve never really considered until seeing how flimsy some of DWs safety systems and focus seems to be 

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I recall with the Harambe gorilla incident, tranqs where dismissed in the events afterwards, due to the time taken to come into effect and the possible adverse reactions from the animal. Ie he might have been calm, but once shot with the tranq, could have become aggressive as well as having a period of time before being sedated. An instant kill was seen as the only option.

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^sure, but if the animal isn't placing people under immediate threat, use a tranq if safe to do so with lethal force on standby. If the animal reacts violently, or the tranq doesn't take effect quickly enough, and the tiger gets into a 'danger zone' of getting too close to guests - then absolutely lethal force is required.

Whilst DW's attractions operations and maintenance have been called into question, I've spoken to several people off board that talk of Pat with reverence, and whilst I haven't met Pat personally, everything i've ever heard about him gives me great confidence that when it comes to the tigers, he would ensure every possible care was taken, and i'm confident that would include neutralisation measures should a tiger escape.

Those guys go into those enclosures every day with nothing but a carton of milk and their hands, and they walk with the tigers every day... but i'm confident each and every one of them would have no hesitation in taking one down if it were to get out and be unresponsive to their training.

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Big issue is the distance to those measures to take action. During early morning  walks people (staff) are in the park and the guns tranquil or otherwise would be far away. They don’t walk with them.

As for pat all i have ever seen is attachment. I hope that would not result in poor decision making. There must be a policy in place. 

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Everyone relax.....there's a red emergency button near the facility.....

😲 he ran  <<<<< >>>>> that way.....

 

 

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8 hours ago, iwerks said:

Just go to the Singapore Daisies - you’ll probably find the tiger there.

Sita loved that stuff. Anyone know which cat does the walks now?

I saw Mya was getting a walk around the park on Thursday.

Edited by -nick.white.1543
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I can answer most of this. While a bullet is a last resort, its the only resort when a predatory animal escapes, as a tranq takes too long to come into effect (minutes, not seconds), and as said earlier, the possibility of pissing it off is immensely high. If it was something that could still be guided while pissed off (ie cassowary) then its a different story, and herding would be the first idea. Many larger establishments (Aus Zoo, Taronga) would try to keep someone trained in firearms around at all times, not too sure about many of the smaller places though as its up to the venue to how they deal with these things. They actually run firearms courses for zookeepers too. It focus' on where to tranq and where to shoot etc. Believe it or not, in close range deals like the animals in the night cage and a vet needs to go in, they either stick the dart to a large stick or use a blowdart. And @Jdude95, it's a Japanese zoo.

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1 hour ago, jjuttp said:

I can answer most of this. While a bullet is a last resort, its the only resort when a predatory animal escapes, as a tranq takes too long to come into effect (minutes, not seconds), and as said earlier, the possibility of pissing it off is immensely high. If it was something that could still be guided while pissed off (ie cassowary) then its a different story, and herding would be the first idea. Many larger establishments (Aus Zoo, Taronga) would try to keep someone trained in firearms around at all times, not too sure about many of the smaller places though as its up to the venue to how they deal with these things. They actually run firearms courses for zookeepers too. It focus' on where to tranq and where to shoot etc. Believe it or not, in close range deals like the animals in the night cage and a vet needs to go in, they either stick the dart to a large stick or use a blowdart. And @Jdude95, it's a Japanese zoo.

Well, out of all the counties I could have picked in Asia, I was close. 

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On 30/06/2018 at 11:18 AM, jjuttp said:

I can answer most of this. While a bullet is a last resort, its the only resort when a predatory animal escapes, as a tranq takes too long to come into effect (minutes, not seconds), and as said earlier, the possibility of pissing it off is immensely high. If it was something that could still be guided while pissed off (ie cassowary) then its a different story, and herding would be the first idea. Many larger establishments (Aus Zoo, Taronga) would try to keep someone trained in firearms around at all times, not too sure about many of the smaller places though as its up to the venue to how they deal with these things. They actually run firearms courses for zookeepers too. It focus' on where to tranq and where to shoot etc. Believe it or not, in close range deals like the animals in the night cage and a vet needs to go in, they either stick the dart to a large stick or use a blowdart. And @Jdude95, it's a Japanese zoo.

Years ago when I went to Aus Zoo they had at least 2 people with rifles when the Croc shows were on, and 1 when someone was in the enclosure cleaning ect.

I didn't see any last time but I only saw the big main show and I assume they hide the men with guns a little better in the big arena.

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