The Parkz Update: Hypercoaster parts arrive ahead of roller coaster announcement

Track, support columns and other components continue to appear at Warner Bros. Movie World for the biggest roller coaster ever built in Australia.

Image: Parkz.

As the September opening of this roller coaster edges closer, parts continue to roll into Movie World where a large section of the car park has been fenced off for storage. The major attraction is yet to be announced as more pieces of the puzzle arrive.

Track and supports have been slowly appearing at the construction site over the last few weeks.

Grey supports and track that's been described as pink, purple, magenta, fuschia and more. Let's just call it not-blue and be done with it.

Parts are being delivered progressively, presumably as they arrive from the German manufacturer by ship, so it could be a while before the staging area starts to fill up.

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Several sections with this double spine have arrived. The two tubular spines have steel plates welded between them.

These sections of track are structurally stronger to withstand higher forces or to support sections of track that have fewer support columns.

Movie World's oldest coaster, and Movie World's newest coaster.

More twisted sections of double spine track seen at the back of this collection.

Here you can get a good idea of the different support joins. The circular plates with 12 small holes join end-to-end to form longer columns. The large octagonal plate (and the square plate behind it to the left) sit on the concrete footings, while the smaller square plate to the right is what joins onto the track.

Anytime you see these I-beam protrusions (H-beams in this photo), you're looking at the base of a support column.

All up there are currently ten pieces of track on site. Only about 100-200 to go...

And there's certainly no shortage of space for these pieces of track.

Track is delivered in open-top containers. Each section is lifted out with a crane and placed into the staging area.

This slow and steady process of just getting the parts ready shows the sheer amount of planning, logistics and work goes into building a roller coaster of this scale.

A section of the garden bed and gutter has been cut away, presumably to build a temporary road during construction.

This section of the car park wasn't fenced off, indicating it could join the cutaway for a temporary entrance to Movie World during construction.

Several palm trees were removed in the process.

The removed palm trees lay on the ground awaiting replanting.

Only small puddles remain from the deluge experienced this week.

The rainfall has made the site a bit damp, but nothing that a few days of clear weather won't fix.

The footings at the construction site have been cleaned up ahead of vertical construction.

Foundation templates that have not been put to use.

Poor lonely templates...

These unused templates may form the footings for the maintenance bay, which will likely be put into place when the station structure starts to come together.

The skyline at Warner Bros. Movie World will be radically different in a few short months.

Elsewhere at Movie World

Wild West Falls splashing down.

Batwing Spaceshot temporarily out of order with seat covers in place.

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