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Supertubes hydrocoaster uses series of Linear Induction Motors (LIM) for propulsion uphill. The boats are fitted with an alloy plate underneath. When the boat passes over the LIM built into the slide it triggers and the rides computer calculates the boats current velocity then engages the LIM array with the energy required to maintain the velocity of the boat. The LIM creates magnetic fields that attract the alloy plate as it travels towards each LIM in the array then repells the plate as it passes over the LIM maintaining the forward motion. THe boat passes over LIM after LIM after LIM as each attracts then repells in sequence until the metal plate is no longer detected by the sensors and the LIM disengages as the boat reaches and passes over the peak of the incline.

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Supertubes hydrocoaster uses series of Linear Induction Motors (LIM) for propulsion uphill. The boats are fitted with an alloy plate underneath. When the boat passes over the LIM built into the slide it triggers and the rides computer calculates the boats current velocity then engages the LIM array with the energy required to maintain the velocity of the boat. The LIM creates magnetic fields that attract the alloy plate as it travels towards each LIM in the array then repells the plate as it passes over the LIM maintaining the forward motion. THe boat passes over LIM after LIM after LIM as each attracts then repells in sequence until the metal plate is no longer detected by the sensors and the LIM disengages as the boat reaches and passes over the peak of the incline.
Do you know what composite the alloy is? Just wondering as it must bean interesting make up.
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That's not really correct; there are a few points that should be cleared up. The bottom of each boat is lined with a layer of non-magnetic alloy (i.e. an alloy with no magnetic properties) topped with a ferromagnetic alloy (i.e. one which is attracted to magnets), most likely a steel. The purpose of the magnetic alloy is to create a magnetic field between the electromagnets under the surface of the slide and this top alloy. The non-magnetic alloy is sandwiched between the top alloy and the surface of the slide and is therefore within the magnetic field. It's important that it is a non-magnetic alloy within this field as regular magnetic attraction is not what is wanted and is not what propels riders forward. As the name LIM suggests, they are induction motors which work on the principal of electromagnetic induction; when the alloy enters the magnetic field it is propelled perpendicular to the direction of the magnetic field. Obviously we have a magnetic field running between the surface of the slide and the steel, so the boat is propelled perpendicular to that, which is straight up the slope. There is no magnetic attraction or repulsion taking place to make the boats travel forward. All that happens is while the alloy is within the magnetic field, a force is created in it that propels it forward. There are a few other things at play but check the earlier Wikipedia article for the more on the technical side. Essentially you can think of it simply as a reversal of Giant Drop's braking system, which also uses induction to slow the gondolas. As for the makeup of the alloys, so long as the magnetic properties of each is right then it's right. You can guarantee the alloy on top would a steel with strong magnetic properties. Coppers would factor highly in the makeup of the other, as probably would aluminium for its corrosion resistance.

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