Richard

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Richard last won the day on October 13 2016

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About Richard

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    http://www.parkz.com.au

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  1. @MARK28, I'm a Medium and I find the sizes to be on-par with 'normal' Australian shirts. Small and Large fit me the same as I'd expect... a bit too tight and a bit too lose. We'll gladly exchange anything should it not fit the way you expected.
  2. Moved the CEO Sleepout to its own topic so we can give this the attention it deserves for the next day or so.
  3. The answer is that there have been two incarnations of Eureka Mountain: https://www.parkz.com.au/parks/AU/Gold_Coast/Dreamworld/ride/2104-Eureka_Mountain_Mine_Ride_original https://www.parkz.com.au/parks/AU/Gold_Coast/Dreamworld/ride/245-Eureka_Mountain_Mine_Ride Both had entirely different layouts and use a different track design and vehicles.
  4. To build on this point, consider that VRTP likes to check and re-check harnesses. That loss of two seats would likely save a conservative 5 or 10 seconds per dispatch; that could well equate to an additional 2-4 cycles an hour. As counter-intuitive as it is, the net result of one less row could be the same or even greater hourly throughput.
  5. Two reasons that doesn't work @Redboost. Firstly they can't physically put a second backwards row in. You'll notice in the renderings that it's the exact same chassis as the other carriages. All they've done is switched the first row of seats around and removed the second row because there's nowhere to put it. In order to keep engineering requirements and costs reasonable they're working within the confines of their existing, rigorously tested technology. Secondly you're expecting people to want to queue for considerably longer to experience the backwards seats, but then have half being forced to ride with an obstructed view? That sort of defeats much of the purpose of the experience. It's a good way to upset half of those willing to queue longer.
  6. What are we basing this "initially thought demand" on? It's somewhat apparent from the station layout that the back row will have its own queue. You know what will happen when that queue reaches a certain length? People will skip it and join the main queue or find something else to ride. It's kind of how rides have worked for a century or so...
  7. I agree that they need to manage the demand for this ride very carefully but I'd go the other way. Make it a premium upcharge. $10-20 on top of the top tier Fast Track for a single skip-the-queue for the hyper. One per person per day. Failing that then open the ride an hour early exclusively for a new ~$100 top tier Fast Track pass. Prime opportunity for them to unveil a season Fast Track pass. $500ish gets you a single skip-the-queue per ride per visit.
  8. Hard to make out in the low res shot but while the support structure is obviously not the finished product, that's definitely non-inverting.
  9. I don't think it's a secret that the construction process is directly tied to logistics. New track/supports arrive, there's a hive of activity for a little while and then things slow down until more parts arrive. It's also worthwhile to note that it's perfectly plausible that they built flexibility and extra time into the construction schedule anticipating shipping delays. Testing is due to commence in August; this was said in the same breath as the October opening date. That seems to indicate that things are still well on track and this isn't a delay so much as a strategic decision. October makes sense as an official date because it can be tied in with Fright Nights, a teen/adult oriented event rather than the school holidays. But you'd expect that a soft open ("technical rehearsal") takes place in the weeks leading up to Fright Nights if everything goes according to plan during August testing.
  10. Because we're not megalomaniacs that just want to throw bans and punishment around despite otherwise interesting discussion. Pretty sick of the backseat moderating and witch-hunt that everyone seems to be engaging in here. This a thought-provoking topic backed up with well reasoned opinions and facts. It's totally worthy of discussion. Keep your conspiracy theories to yourselves, and if you're posting replies or hitting that downvote button based on anything other than what's being discussed in this topic, then maybe take a break from Parkz for a few days because it's obviously all too much for you.
  11. Just curious what you mean by confirmed? By the park in an official capacity? By the ride manufacturer? Or by the supplier of the paint used? I suspect you could get three different, perfectly valid answers there...
  12. Motocoaster is painful and dreadfully paced but you can't deny it's a fun ride that offers a good sensation of speed for the first half or so. Like I said back then in those 2007 posts, it slots in below Cyclone... Yeah I get your point. We're counting our chickens / slicing bread / mixing metaphors before they hatch. But also... it's all true. It will be all these things. Quote me on it... in 2027...
  13. For what it's worth we were calling Motocoaster for what it was well before it opened too. No doubts in my mind where this new ride will sit in Australia and where it deserves to sit on the world scale. No one could ever claim that I've ever gone easy on our parks or lowered the bar because it's Australia. I'd take this hyper over everything on that list @Santa07, with the possible exception of the RMCs. @rac2703 simple... because magic and now, not magic and whenever-you-get-around-to-it. Yeah, this was an unashamed puff piece. The working title was "putting the hype in hypercoaster". If VRTP can't or won't do a hype/teaser campaign then we might as well fill that void. But I'm pretty confident that the tone of this article will be vindicated once reviews start rolling in for this thing...
  14. It's laughable how Deborah Thomas was able to throw the Disneyland buzzword out there and distract people while saying exactly what yesterday's ASX release said. It is a transparently obvious attempt at damage control. I can't work out if this company is naive enough to genuinely think that shops and apartments to cash in on the Westfield development will benefit Dreamworld. I want to say that this zoning review is motivated by pure dollars and cents, but this company's strategic blunders in recent years makes me think they might actually believe themselves when they say Disneyland.
  15. You seem to be focusing on the banking transitions in and out of elements, which really have nothing to do with the greying/blacking out that people here are speaking of. Jet Rescue is a (surprisingly) wild ride that throws you around smoothly from side to side, but these are not sustained positive g-forces. The concept of so-called heartline design you refer to is about smoothing the ride experience rather than reducing the forces. I believe the point @Gazza was making with Jet Rescue is that these rapid-fire turns and direction changes don't typically result in heavy sustained positive g-forces for the pure fact that they're manageable forces in short bursts. Those momentary let-ups in positive g-forces would help hugely with blood flow for those prone to greying out. Jet Rescue -- and even Motocoaster -- are nothing but banked turns and they're fine. I see no reason for anyone to be scared about the forces on this one based on photos of a few twists and turns.