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Randy23

krispy kremes

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Hey At Movie World they have krispy kremes It is sold at these outlets : Bakery Newspaper stand (sometimes) They are sold in half dozen and dozen Have you say??

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very overrated if you ask me. Light and fluffy, but overly sweet in most cases, their plain donuts dont really taste like donuts, its kinda hard to explain. Donuts should be crispy on the outside but kinda gooey inside, should have some sort of weight to them.

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And thats because you've been corrupted by the Donut Kings and the local bakeries in Aus who all cook their Donuts by dropping a scoop of raw dough directly into boiling oil. Krispy Kreme have been around a lot longer than that, and they do it the right way - the dough is prepared fresh, and proofed in a moderate proofing oven until the dough has risen. THe dough is then slid into the oil pan, flipped, and then slid out of the oil pan, through the glazer, and voila. If you've ever had a Krispy Kreme fresh out of the oven, THEN and only then, would you know what a real donut tastes like.

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And thats because you've been corrupted by the Donut Kings and the local bakeries in Aus who all cook their Donuts by dropping a scoop of raw dough directly into boiling oil. Krispy Kreme have been around a lot longer than that, and they do it the right way - the dough is prepared fresh, and proofed in a moderate proofing oven until the dough has risen. THe dough is then slid into the oil pan, flipped, and then slid out of the oil pan, through the glazer, and voila. If you've ever had a Krispy Kreme fresh out of the oven, THEN and only then, would you know what a real donut tastes like.
sorry, but thats just not a donut. There should be some dough, hence the name, it shouldnt be a light kinda fluffy cake consistancy. They were always deep fried, so you have it arse about backwards, its only been an american thing to do it differently recently baking or part baking them. If you want to find a source of donuts, look towards the dutch. Dutch donuts (called oliebollen) are what is essentially traditional donuts, a puffy ball with a doughy centre, sometimes they are filled with fruit and spice. The resulting donuts are crisp on the outside, but doughy inside. See where it came from? and fyi, I am best friends with a couple of bakers who make 3 different varieties of donuts, including the original dutch ones.

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Why are you arguing about which donuts are better, I mean everyone knows Churros are the best kind. /discussion. Also fyi, the traditional ring shaped donut was created by an American, who baked it in an oven. In fact, the spelling of donut your using (as opposed to doughnut) is the American spelling, so you would be referring to the American ring donut, not the original dutch doughnut which is not like our traditional donut at all. Also, I think you will find that looking back at the massive lines, people camping out and massive customer base which occurred when Krispy Kreme opened in Brisbane/Sydney, you will see what type of donuts people prefer.

Edited by DonjaiInLA

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Go back to the original KK store opening in Penrith, NSW, where people camped for weeks waiting for the store to open. Where the hot light did not turn off for 3 MONTHS straight (except for cleaning and oil change). Where the Country express trains leaving Penrith for the City was packed with commuters who had bought SHOPPING TROLLEYS FULL of boxed Dozen original glazed or krispy assorted (and these were people who wouldn't even look sideways at an ordinary donut shop). Where the queues ran round the block, round the clock, and the last 200 metres before the doors were enclosed in those big marquee tents (and still damn cold in the winter) Krispy Kreme - the first donut store with a drive through. And KK are "doughy" - "fluffy on the inside" and "crisp on the outside" umm... hello? KRISPY KREME, not to mention, that you are obviously referring only to the original glazed. Krispy Kreme aren't JUST the original glazed, although, obviously, it is one of their signature products. Try getting a boxed assorted dozen, and i'll bet you find one you like. Devil's Food is my personal favourite, although they did a mint chip one a while back that was Kreme filled, and it came a close second. Also, if you read carefully - I did actually say that the krispy Kreme are fried in oil. THey're just proofed in an oven first to let the dough rise, rather than baking the raw dough. Most bakers will proof a dough before they bake it - or didn't your FYI friends tell you?

Edited by AlexB

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Why are you arguing about which donuts are better, I mean everyone knows Churros are the best kind. /discussion. Also fyi, the traditional ring shaped donut was created by an American, who baked it in an oven. In fact, the spelling of donut your using (as opposed to doughnut) is the American spelling, so you would be referring to the American ring donut, not the original dutch doughnut which is not like our traditional donut at all. Also, I think you will find that looking back at the massive lines, people camping out and massive customer base which occurred when Krispy Kreme opened in Brisbane/Sydney, you will see what type of donuts people prefer.
Sorry, but you are wrong. It wasnt baked in an oven, it was fried. here is an example. http://www.wentz.net/donut/history_of_the_donut.htm The american donuts are actually the very same dutch ones. They arrived in america and were made just the same as the dutch ones, deep fried with a centre filled with fruit or nuts. And I agree, churros are much better :) Yeah, and how are all their stores doing now? same thing happened on the coast. AND FYI, you dont have to proof the batter, they use an active yeast. With everything else you have to make, you simply dont need to take more time to make something when it isnt needed. About the only thing a bakery might proof these days are some specialist doughs, biscuit bases (largely to keep them fresh over a number of days) and maybe if they have a large number of loaves to bake the next day. edit: its not an oven either. Its a just a cabinet, similar perhaps to display cabinets you might see out the front (for instance, the pie warmers). All it does is provide a warm, moist place for the yeast to ferment, doesnt get anywhere near hot enough to be an oven, its just used to warm. Edited by Mad Hatter

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How Krispy Kremes are made Donut Wiki Interesting though that the american company Krispy Kreme spells it Doughnut though, don't you think? I think the issue here is in the description - Hatter describes what is typically called a cake donut - your typical bakery \ donut king cinnamon styled donut (whether it is actually cinnamon or not). Whereas I am describing a Yeast Donut, typically larger, utilising yeast to make it lighter and fluffier. KK also use Dough, as in Doughnut, as opposed to the Batter that hatter refers to. The problem is that the typical dutch doughnut WAS a yeast donut, and WAS proofed prior to frying (whether you call it a proofing oven, or a proofing box, or just a proofer it doesn't matter. Pie Warmers are also called Pie Ovens, and serve the same purpose - controlled heat and humidity. If we're going to fuss that they don't get as hot as an oven, then kilns shouldn't be called pottery ovens, and Skoda's shouldn't be called cars). Active yeasts don't require proofing, but you still get a better result if you do, as the dough - of any baked product - is less rubbery, more fluffy. Donuts are also not deep fried. The oil pans usually used to cook donuts are several inches deep, but this is only to maintain the oil temperature without the need for constant heating. Donuts can be fried in a frying pan with the same result, and a lot less oil. And FYI - most "bakers" can make what their franchisee tells them to make. And if they are family owned (are there still any out there?) then they've made it the same way their parents did before them, and will only accept their way as the right way regardless of what anyone else does. And FYI - i'm open to there being more than one way to make a donut. Are You? And FYI - depending on the reference that you cite, the origins of a donut aren't known, with several different historical references out there And FYI - these little FYI's are annoying, and condescending, aren't they?

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