themagician

The New Atlantis - Construction Updates

338 posts in this topic

Even if it is completed what are the chances of getting the sign off in the time expected  to begin operating? VRL cannot control the speeds of Government departments. 

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Same Government. Can’t control their speed or requests. You would expect them to be on top of this but who knows

Edited by dbo121
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Not just paperwork. For example does the Government know exactly what it is asking or needs before signing off ? Unlikely and determining that takes time .

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2 hours ago, dbo121 said:

Not just paperwork. For example does the Government know exactly what it is asking or needs before signing off ? Unlikely and determining that takes time .

Do you actually have any idea what you are talking about? Or just taking blind stabs in the dark?

Dreamworld’s issue hasn’t been the government taking too long to process paperwork 

Edited by Brad2912

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I do know how government departments work. This is not just paperwork I’m talking about . The government framework is evolving and requirements for a operational license are not set in stone.  This could delay VRL in meeting these dynamic requirements. We can hope they are taking the lead on this but can not control the other parties response timing. Sometimes though companies also make errors of judgement too.

One of Sv issues would revolve around this government relationship. The Government would treat VRL and Dreamworld with the same oversight mechanisms. There are probably many other problems with Sv but I’m talking about VRL here .

There is a risk timing will be delayed for other than construction reasons is all I’m highlighting.

 

 

Edited by dbo121
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Yeah there's a couple things you're missing:

  1. VRTP would know what the issues are with SV. They're competitors, but they're also peers in industry. Many in the industry know what has gone wrong.
  2. VRTP would have known this before they even announced the ride. They would be ensuring that whatever the issues are are addressed at design phase, rather than licensing phase.
  3. Huss is not a new manufacturer to Australia's shores. They have built many travelling and park model rides that still operate around Australia (and the world). They aren't new to the game, they were founded in 1919 building parts for ship engines and have been building amusement rides since 1969.
  4. Counter that with Brogent - labelled a 'software' company on google, "made in taiwan", who I believe launched i-ride in 2007. Theres a lot of decades between the two.

Check out this exclusive behind the scenes video of technicians working on the i-ride components

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2 hours ago, AlexB said:

 

  1. Counter that with Brogent - labelled a 'software' company on google, "made in taiwan", who I believe launched i-ride in 2007. Theres a lot of decades between the two.

 

Are you saying my replacement iPhone charger I purchased on eBay, coming from Taiwan won’t be hunky dory?

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2 hours ago, Skeeta said:

Are you saying my replacement iPhone charger I purchased on eBay, coming from Taiwan won’t be hunky dory?

Well, this all depends.... has it been tested and certified to Australian requirements?

30 minutes ago, dbo121 said:

A lot of faith in those points. I hope this is the case. Time will tell .

Faith? Try facts bud.

Look, its fine to be skeptical. The past few years have seen huge change in the industry. But you've asked a question, which suggests you aren't aware of all the facts. People have answered your question with several reasons why it isn't likely to be an issue.

If you're just going to be argumentative, and shoot down any reasonable and well thought out answer because of "what if" and "who knows" then fine, that's your prerogative, but you have the answer to your question, like it or lump it.

While its still possible the ride can be delayed for any number of reasons, I doubt regulatory signoff is going to be one of them. Come these Christmas holidays, we will see how a properly run park, and a properly run ride manufacturer go about on-boarding a new ride. Then you can take all that, roll it flat, dry it in the summer sun for a few days, chop it up, and pack it in your pipe. I'll buy you a box of matches.

 

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Certifications take time and you assume the Government process is clear at moment and will be  timely. This is not in control of vrl or a manufacturer.   I’ll hit you up for the box of matches if I’m wrong to smoke the pipe. 

Edited by dbo121
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Silly me... I forgot that VTP (one of Qld’s leading tourism, events and entertainment companies) has no relationships or contacts within the levels of government that could have assisted them with relevant timelines to incorporate into their launch plans. They just guessed, of course. 

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3 hours ago, dbo121 said:

Certifications take time and you assume the Government process is clear at moment and will be  timely. This is not in control of vrl or a manufacturer.   I’ll hit you up for the box of matches if I’m wrong to smoke the pipe. 

Yes, they certainly do take time. But you're pointing to one failed venture at a different park, using a manufacturer unfamiliar with our standards and systems, and trying to extrapolate that over an entire industry, all the while ignoring the fact that the installation you're talking about now is manufactured by a company with YEARS of experience working in Australia, being built by a company that operates (or has operated) theme parks, water parks and attractions in several Australian states, AND OVERSEAS, successfully opening attractions in numerous jurisdictions.

(Warning - TL:DR ahead)

TL:DR - Trust me, if the ride is compliant, approval won't hold up the ride opening.

 

As has been mentioned, VRTP will be working closely with the relevant authorities to ensure things are met on time. Dreamworld's issues are not a case of 'delayed paperwork' (well, not the government's delay anyway). Project timelines allow for regulatory approval, and they'll all be well aware of the requirements, and allow enough lead time. The trick is to have all your ducks in a row.

The difference at Dreamworld, is that they've come off the back of a workplace health and safety mentality of "we're really good at doing our maintenance, so we should be exempt from the regulatory inspections that everyone else has to do" (this is a paraphrased truth - feel free to look it up).

You've suggested you know how government departments work. It would be insulting of me to guess which department, but no doubt a customer facing one like FACS or ATO or something like that.

These departments have 'service standards' or similar commitments to the government and to the public that say 'this is how long something should normally take', and statistically, 80% (in some departments even 90% or more) of the time, these standards are met. In a lot of cases, they're met earlier, because the task or request is simple (like a tax refund - which the media reported recently some people got in as little as 12 days, when the standard is 28).

In some cases, they exceed the standard, usually because either the issue is more complex than usual, or there is a delay in getting all required information. Sometimes, they just stuff up. Someone gets sick, the work gets put in the wrong in-tray and is overlooked, a glitch... whatever. These things happen, mainly due to human error - because everyone is human, and humanity is not a problem that is exclusive to government departments (it just seems to be more visible).

VRTP isn't dealing with these large volume, large customer base departments. They have high visibility, and they and their businesses contribute a lot to the economy, including jobs, tourism and so on. Of course, there are other businesses also requiring regulatory approval, and we can assume nobody receives "preferential" treatment, but there's a lot less of them than say - Joe Tax Refund, and they're a lot more organised, and have a much better understanding of the lead time required. These regulatory authorities know what is at stake for businesses all over the country if things aren't done in a timely manner. Everybody works together, Everybody knows the rules, and provided equipment is built to code, certified as such, and the correct paperwork is present, the process is fairly predictable. All of these things will be well in-hand.

You're arguing that stamping the relevant paperwork could take a day, or a year, and nobody knows when it will be. In saying this, you're ignoring the fairly consistent for decades on-or-near-time openings of attractions across Australia.

 

 

TL:DR - Trust me, if the ride is compliant, approval won't hold up the ride opening.

Edited by AlexB

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